Texas A&M animal science department mourns loss of faculty member

Darrell Knabe remembered for teaching, animal nutrition research

Contact:: Courtney Coufal, 979-845-1542, cacoufal@tamu.edu

COLLEGE STATION — Dr. Darrell Knabe, professor of animal nutrition in the department of animal science at Texas A&M University, died Dec. 25, at his home in Bryan. He was 62.

“Dr. Knabe will be missed by everyone in our department, especially his students,” said Dr. Russell Cross, professor and head of animal science. “Darrell truly cared for his students and it showed in the countless hours he devoted to the classroom.  His commitment to teaching epitomizes what makes this department so special.”

Dr. Darrell Knabe

Knabe joined the department of animal science as an assistant professor in 1978 and attained the rank of full professor in 1991. Over the course of his 34-year career, Knabe educated thousands of Aggies through his animal nutrition and swine production courses, Cross said. His research efforts focused primarily on protein and amino acid nutrition of growing swine and the nutritional means of increasing reproductive efficiency in sows.

He received the Distinguished Teaching Award from the Association of Former Students and twice received the Outstanding Professor Award from Texas A&M University Collegiate Chapter of FFA.

Knabe earned a bachelor of science in agriculture from West Texas State University (now West Texas A&M University) in 1971. He continued his education and earned both a master of science and doctorate in animal science from Texas A&M University.

After graduation, he was employed for two years at ACCO Feeds in Abilene as a swine nutritionist before returning to Texas A&M to start his career in education.

He was preceded in death by parents, Adolph and Beatrice, of Hereford.

Memorial contributions may be made to Hospice Brazos Valley, Texas A&M University department of animal science or Hillcrest Baptist Church, Bryan.

Condolences may be left online at www.callawayjones.com.

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