Training on winter pastures for Central and East Texas set Aug. 23

Seeding Winter Pasture

With winter pasture, livestock producers can “greatly reduce the amount of hay and supplementation they would otherwise need during the winter feeding program,” according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service forage specialist. (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service photo by Dr. Vanessa Corriher-Olson)

Expert: Big mistake not to plan winter pastures early

Writer: Robert Burns, 903-834-6191, rd-burns@tamu.edu

OVERTON – Many producers contact her too late for advice in establishing winter pastures, said Dr. Vanessa Corriher-Olson, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service forage specialist, Overton.

“And when it comes to winter pastures, there’s nothing worse than too late,” Corriher-Olson said.

To help producers do the best possible job of planning winter pastures, Corriher-Olson and her colleague, Dr. Jason Banta, AgriLife Extension beef specialist, will be conducting a short course, “Winter Pastures for Central and East Texas,” from 9:30 a.m – 5 p.m. Aug. 23 at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Overton.

Registration for the program is $60 and includes lunch and program materials. Seating will be limited to the first 50 people to register. Register online by going to https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu and entering the keyword “pasture.”

Corriher-Olson said the program will answer a lot of the questions people commonly have about establishing winter pastures, such as:

Which species are best suited to a particular type of operation?
How much in feed costs can they expect to save?
How do I interpret seed tag information?
How can I create a custom soil and production map for a farm from satellite data?

She said it will also answer many questions that even experienced producers may not think to ask but should, including questions on appropriate mineral supplementation for cattle; control costs for armyworms and other cool-season insects; and how to use U.S. Department of Agriculture Web Soil Survey information to plan plantings.

“This is an intensive, day-long program that will help producers greatly
reduce the amount of hay and supplementation they would otherwise need during the winter feeding program,” Corriher-Olson said. “By decreasing such costs, they can greatly improve the economic bottom line of their operations.”

A question and answer session will follow the presentations, Banta said.

The program will offer two continuing education units to Texas Department of Agriculture private pesticide applicator license holders, one in the integrated pest management category and one in general.

For more information, call Michelle Sensing at 903-834-6191.

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