Free Septic System Maintenance Workshop set Sept. 17 in Lampasas

Septic system training

Septic systems are not flush-and-forget systems. Maintenance is essential to ensure longevity of the system, according to Lisa Prcin, Lampasas River Watershed Coordinator, Temple. (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service photo)

Writer: Robert Burns, 903-312-3199, rd-burns@tamu.edu

LAMPASAS – A free training on maintenance of home septic systems will be held from 6 – 8 p.m. Sept. 17 at the Lampasas County Farm Bureau building, 1793 U.S. Highway 281, in Lampasas.
“Septic systems are not flush-and-forget systems,” said Lisa Prcin, Lampasas River Watershed Coordinator, Temple. “Maintenance is essential to ensure proper function and longevity of your septic system.”

Sponsored by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the Lampasas River Watershed Partnership, “the course provides a basic understanding of the operational and maintenance activities of a septic system, and explains how activities within the home impact septic systems,” Prcin said.

“Presentations will cover the treatment processes, health and safety considerations, how to inspect, care for and feed the system, and general maintenance procedures,” she said.

The program is a part of the Lampasas River Watershed Protection Plan, developed by the Lampasas River Watershed Partnership, a collaborative effort by local stakeholders, AgriLife Research, and Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board to address water quality concerns within the Lampasas River watershed, according to Prcin.

The Lampasas River watershed encompasses parts of Mills, Hamilton, Lampasas, Coryell, Burnet, Bell and Williamson counties.

To register, contact Prcin at 254-774-6008 or lprcin@brc.tamus.edu.

For more information, contact Ryan Gerlich, AgriLife Extension environmental soil and water specialist, College Station, at 979-458-4185 or visit http://ossf.tamu.edu/.

Funding and support for the development of the Lampasas River Watershed Protection Plan is provided through a Clean Water Act Nonpoint Source grant from the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

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