‘Creative’ sausage workshop draws participants from across U.S.

Attendees learn more about the finer points of making good sausage

Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu

Contact: Dr. Wes Osburn, 979-845-3989, osburnw@tamu.edu

COLLEGE STATION – Making good sausage was the focus of Texans and out-of-state enthusiasts at a recent “creative” sausage workshop held at Texas A&M University.

Hosted by the department of animal science at Texas A&M, attendees went home with a wealth of knowledge about making their own sausage, according to organizers.

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“We took each of the participants through the grinding and mixing process, teaching them how to make sausage with the actual equipment found in their own kitchen,” said Dr. Wes Osburn, associate professor in the meat science section of the department and a Texas A&M AgriLife Research meat scientist.

Dr. Wes Osburn, Dr. Wes Osburn, associate professor in the meat science section of the department and a Texas A&M AgriLife Research meat scientist, guided participants through the sausage making process. (Texas A&M AgriLife Communications photo by Blair Fannin)

Dr. Wes Osburn, associate professor in the meat science section of the department of animal science at Texas A&M and a Texas A&M AgriLife Research meat scientist, guided participants through the sausage making process. (Texas A&M AgriLife Communications photo by Blair Fannin)

The workshop was open to both beginning and novice sausage makers. Osburn said attendees used tabletop grinders, KitchenAid mixers, hand-cranked sausage stuffers and natural or artificial casings.

“This workshop was generated from previous brisket boot camps run several times already,” Osburn  said. “Some attendees said they had an interest in learning how to make sausage at home.

“Dr. Davey Griffin and I got together and decided to develop a creative sausage course. We wanted to show the basics of sausage making and use equipment you would find in the kitchen versus the commercial production methods. What we had at the workshop was something you can actually get and use in your home, food processors and hand-cranked stuffers that you can find at a retail outlet.”

Osburn currently teaches undergraduate and graduate students the concepts and practice of developing quality food systems and graduate students in the principles and science of processed meats. He also conducts research working with the meat industry in “helping solve problems, implementing new technology and improving the quality and safety of their products.”

Participants had both classroom and hands-on experiences, learning many aspects of sausage making from meat selection, ingredients, casings, stuffing, equipment and processing to the final finished product.

Each individual had the opportunity to manufacture their own sausages, both smoked and fresh, and take some home.

“We had people that came from out of state,” he said. “Participants came from Massachusetts, California and a good many from Texas. We are so happy they came and shared their interest in making good sausage. I think all of them went away learning something new and can be very proud of the sausage they made.”

(Texas A&M AgriLife Communications photo by Blair Fannin)

(Texas A&M AgriLife Communications photo by Blair Fannin)

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