A&M farm crop tour features latest weed control advances in corn, cotton

Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu

COLLEGE STATION – The latest strategies in managing problem weeds in corn and cotton were recently showcased at the 2014 Crop Tour at the Texas A&M University field laboratory near College Station that serves as a research and teaching platform for Texas A&M AgriLife.

(From left) Adam Hixson, Adam Hixson, BASF technical services representative, Lubbock, and Matt Matocha, AgriLife Extension program specialist—weed science,  College Station, teamed up to present  "Corn Herbicides Overlapping Residual Programs for Weed Resistance" at the 2014 Crop Tour at the Texas A&M University field laboratory near College Station. (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service photo by Blair Fannin)

(From left) Adam Hixson, BASF technical services representative, Lubbock, and Matt Matocha, AgriLife Extension program specialist—weed science, College Station, teamed up to present “Corn Herbicides Overlapping Residual Programs for Weed Resistance” at the 2014 Crop Tour at the Texas A&M University field laboratory near College Station. (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service photo by Blair Fannin)

The event was sponsored by BASF Corp. and the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service. More than 100 area producers, consultants and industry partners attended the field day.

“The purpose of this field day is to help bring awareness to distributors and growers, and encourage them to pay close attention to what their weed control issues might be,” said Matt Matocha, AgriLife Extension program specialist—weed science,  College Station. “Whether it be large-seeded broadleaves, small-seeded broadleaves or annual or perennial grasses, be aware of what you have and take time to ask questions with consultants and AgriLifeExtension personnel  to aid in developing the best approach in combating problem weeds with special emphasis on combating resistant weeds.”

Matt Matocha, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service soils specialist, College Station, discusses weed control options at a recent crop tour at the Texas A&M University field laboratory near College Station. (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service photo by Blair Fannin)

Matt Matocha, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service soils specialist, College Station, discusses weed control options at a recent crop tour at the Texas A&M University field laboratory near College Station. (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service photo by Blair Fannin)

Matocha and Adam Hixson, BASF technical services representative, Lubbock, teamed up to present  “Corn Herbicides Overlapping Residual Programs for Weed Resistance,” part of six rotating tour stops during the half-day event.

Hixson said producers need to have a good understanding of the weeds they are encountering in their crops.

“The most important thing for a producer to know about their weed control program is what weeds they are dealing with,” he said. “For example, are they dealing with grasses, waterhemp, pigweed – Palmer amaranth –  or tough to control large-seeded species such as morning glory?  Waterhemps and pigweeds, especially Palmer amaranth, have been found and confirmed to have resistance to glyphosate – Roundup, etc. – in several locations in Texas. Therefore, it is imperative that growers employ aggressive measures now in order to successfully manage these resistant weeds. “

Matocha said AgriLife Extension has tested a number of products for weed control in corn. He provided an overview of products and trial results to attendees.

“Overall, what we try to preach and make growers realize (is that) foundation residual herbicides appliedright behind the planter is integral part to combatting resistant weeds,” he said. “That also includes following up with postemergence applications that has an effective component that will control both resistant and non-herbicide resistant weeds. Ideally, this treatment should also have residual product in the tank mix that will help lengthen that control throughout the season.”

Hixson discussed a new product to come on the market in the future called Engenia.

“Engenia is our new Dicamba product that has low volatility characteristics that will be used in Dicamba tolerant soybeans and cotton,” he said. “It should be available next year on a small scale.”

Matocha said he was pleased with the large attendance and the number of inquiries.

 

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