AgriLife Extension in Bexar County welcomes two new employees

Writer: Paul Schattenberg, 210-859-5752, paschattenberg@ag.tamu.edu

Contacts: Robyn White, 210-631-0400, Robyn.White@ag.tamu.edu

Natalie Ramos, 210-631-0400, Natalie.Ramos@ag.tamu.edu

Angie Gutierrez, 210-631-0400, aogitierrez@ag.tamu.edu

SAN ANTONIO – Two new employees have recently joined the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service office in Bexar County.

Robyn White was hired as the new 4-H agent for the Cooperative Extension Program of Prairie View A&M University, part of the Texas A&M University System. Natalie Ramos was hired as an AgriLife Extension assistant for the agency’s Better Living for Texans, or BLT, program

White and Ramos will serve residents of Bexar County through planning and implementing  community-based educational programs.

Robyn White. (Texas A&M AgriLife Communications photo by Paul Schattenberg)

In her role, White will plan, implement and evaluate educational youth development programs, focusing on limited-resource communities. She will also identify, recruit and train local adult volunteer leaders in stakeholder committees to help provide direction for and support programs related to 4-H and youth development.

White has a master’s degree in public health from the Texas A&M Health Science Center – School of Rural Public Health and a bachelor’s degree in health from Texas A&M University in College Station. She has a background in public and community health promotion, including experience in community health promotion programs aimed at reducing childhood obesity and promoting youth leadership and development.

Her professional experience has included work as an administrative assistant at Amerita Specialty Infusion Service based in Colorado and as a client services intern, special projects administrator, and sales and marketing coordinator at HealthHelp.

She also served as a program assistant at the Texas A&M Health Science Center – School of Rural Public Health in College Station, as well as a graduate assistant and program assistant with the department of recreation, parks and tourism sciences at Texas A&M. She was also a lead research assistant at the Child and Adolescent Health Research Lab and an Aggie Access Learning Communities mentor at Texas A&M.

“Under the Prairie View A&M University Cooperative Extension Program, my target audience for 4-H will be youth from underserved and low-income families in the county,” White said. “I plan to work with other youth-oriented groups in the community such as Boys and Girls Clubs and afterschool programs to further develop youths’ skills in areas such as health, science, agriculture and citizenship.”

Ramos will support the Better Living for Texans program — a statewide nutrition education program that teaches nutrition-related concepts focusing on healthy menu choices, proper nutrition, preparing healthy meals and promoting physical fitness. A primary goal of the program is to provide educational programs to help Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, recipients make healthy food choices.

Ramos has a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology from the University of Texas at San Antonio and is currently completing coursework to become a registered dietician.

Natalie Ramos. (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service photo by Frances Moreno-Elizondo)

Before joining AgriLife Extension, Ramos was a medical and administrative assistant with Houston Foot and Ankle and a rehabilitation therapy technician with Campbell Medical Clinic. She also served as a Recipe for Success volunteer at the Houston Independent School District.

Her other work has included service as a physical education intern with Harlandale and Judson school districts and with a mobile health lab for diabetes awareness at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

“I’m looking forward to working with residents of Bexar County, especially those using SNAP, and helping them with their nutritional and physical fitness needs,” Ramos said. “Many of the people I will serve in this position will typically be lower-income individuals from age 60 to about 75.”

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