New AgriLife Extension horticulture agent hired in Lubbock County

Writer: Kay Ledbetter, 806-677-5608, skledbetter@ag.tamu.edu
Contact: Christina Reid, 806-775-1740, ext. 1747, christina.reid@ag.tamu.edu

LUBBOCK – Christina Reid knew when she moved back to Lubbock she wanted to work as the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service horticulture agent for Lubbock County. The opportunity arose, and she began her new position on Sept. 17.

Christina Reid has been hired as the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service horticulture agent in Lubbock County. (Texas A&M AgriLife photo)

“AgriLife Extension is extremely fortunate to add Christina Reid to the Lubbock County Extension faculty,” said Michael Clawson, AgriLife Extension district administrator at Lubbock. “Her knowledge about horticulture, prior experience as a horticulture Extension agent in Oklahoma, and her professional relationships throughout the landscape industry in the Lubbock area are valuable assets as she starts her new career.

“Christina has a passion to serve and help others through Extension education. This passion, along with her positive and welcoming personality, will strengthen AgriLife Extension’s programming efforts in horticulture and water conservation education. I am excited about Christina serving in this position and the quality of educational opportunities she will provide to the citizens of Lubbock County.”

A native of Rockwall, Reid earned a bachelor’s degree in landscape architecture with a minor in horticulture from Texas Tech University. She worked as a horticulture educator with Oklahoma State University Extension in Oklahoma County, as well as with a variety of nursery and landscape companies.

“I’m excited about this opportunity and I look forward to working with and advising the Master Gardeners in Lubbock County and generating more interest in the program,” she said. “I also will be looking for outreach opportunities within the community to provide more education on water-saving tips, new horticultural information and, in general, good horticultural practices.”

Reid said the agency’s Earth Kind program is important to her because it “summarizes all the best practices in horticulture, such as being able to organically treat for pests, using your water smartly and using plants native to our region that don’t need the added water and chemicals.”

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